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Mississagi Provincial Park – A Northern Ontario Treasure

Mississagi Provincial Park – A Northern Ontario Treasure

Mississagi Provincial Park, located just 25 kilometres north of the city of Elliot Lake, has been called “one of Ontario’s last true natural parks.” The park offers visitors a chance to hike, canoe, bike, swim and enjoy nature in a park that aside from 60 front-country campsites, seven backcountry campsites and seven hiking trails is preserved in its natural state.

Mississagi Provincial Park features one of the best views in Ontario, an incredible fall foliage display (!!!) and the chance to get away from people. On my trip we had the whole of Helenbar Lake to ourselves!

Mississagi Provincial Park: A Gem of the North You've Never Heard Of

The welcome sign when you arrive at Mississagi Provincial Park – and yet on our late August trip we didn’t see a single mosquito

Our plan for a two day visit to Mississagi Provincial Park focused on canoeing – but once we got to the park and spoke with staff members, we realized it would be a snap to include the hike on the Helenbar Trail to the viewpoint over the lake which you can read about later in this blog.

Canoeing in Mississagi Provincial Park

It was pretty darned simple to get out on the water. There are canoes (albeit heavy ones) you can rent that are located right beside the dock on Semiwite Lake. Parking is within eyesight so it’s a quick operation to get unloaded, repacked and out on the water.

The canoeing was easy. We paddled parallel to the north shore of Semiwite Lake so we wouldn’t miss the portage to Helenbar Lake. We needn’t have worried as it was well-signed and very obvious beside a big beach.

I’m not one to impose myself on people but when a couple of twenty year old fellows hanging around the portage site with their friends asked if we wanted help portaging I said an immediate yes.

Normally John would balk at any help but he had a separated shoulder and I was pushing my luck just getting him into a canoe. The bottom line is that Alan and Callum saved us a good bit of time and energy.

Helenbar Lake

It’s a 400 metre portage to reach Helenbar Lake – and an easy one compared to many that we did last summer in Quetico Provincial Park. Once on Helenbar Lake it was a short paddle across the lake to reach the one backcountry campsite. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a great place for swimming (watch for leeches) but it did offer a nice big open area for camping.

After a delicious dinner, a glass of wine and the good company of old friends, it was time for an evening paddle. My friend Jo and I had a lot of laughs while exploring a swampy outlet where it got so narrow we couldn’t paddle.

By the time we got out of there, the first stars of the night made an appearance. Normally I’d never paddle a canoe at night but we had zero concerns about motorboats and the water was dead calm. It was particularly beautiful looking into the heavens – watching the day fade away.

On the return trip the following day we retraced our steps, stopping half way along the portage trail to include the hike on the Helenbar Lake trail to the lookout.

Gloster Meteor

We did take a bit of time to peer into the depths of the lake (it’s shallow) to see if we could spot the wreckage of a Gloster Meteor, one of the first jet fighters in Britain. (Ask at the Visitor Centre for more detailed location information.)

The story goes that the pilot lost his way in a storm, ran out of fuel and crashed but survived for 26 days. At that point he heard an outboard motor boat over on Semiwite Lake, bushwhacked over to the lake and found a fisherman who helped him to safety.

Getting ready for our two day canoe trip in Mississagi

Getting ready for our two day canoe trip in Mississagi Provincial Park

Two

Two helpful young men – Alan and Callum portaged our heavy canoe to Helenbar Lake

My friend Jo helping with the portage

My friend Jo helping with the portage

Keeper

Keeper the dog chilling

Our campsite on Helenbar Lake

Our campsite on Helenbar Lake

Our friend Ted cooking up a storm at the campsite

Our friend Ted cooking up a storm at the campsite

No worries about motor boats on an evening paddle as there aren't any on Helenbar Lake

No worries about motor boats on an evening paddle as there aren’t any on Helenbar Lake

 Exploring an outlet that ultimately ends at the Boland River

Exploring an outlet that ultimately ends at the Boland River (as far as I can tell) but good luck getting there as it narrows quickly

Mississagi Provincial Park is a peaceful place to ponder life

Mississagi is a peaceful place to ponder life

Heading back to the cars

Heading back to the cars

Hiking in Mississagi Provincial Park

You have the choice of seven trails in the park covering approximately 65 kilometres. There are short ones like the Flack Lake Nature Trail – coming in at less than a kilometre while the 22 kilometre McKenzie Trail is usually done as a two day backpacking trip.

We only did the out and back section of the Helenbar Lake Trail – starting from the portage trail and ending at the scenic lookout. If you started at the campground it would be a moderate 7 kilometre hike.

All of our group thought it was a magnificent hike especially on certain sections through mature hardwood forest and of course at the lookout itself. It’s a stunner – one of the best you’ll find in Ontario, but stay well back from the edge as its slippery with pine needles. If you visit in the next couple of weeks the fall colours will dazzle you so plan a trip NOW.

Mississagi Provincial Park: A Gem of the North You've Never Heard Of

Excellent trail signage in the park

Large beech and hemlock trees can be seen on the trail to the Helenbar Lake overlook

Large beech and hemlock trees can be seen on the trail to the Helenbar Lake overlook

Mississagi Provincial Park: A Gem of the North You've Never Heard Of

The incredible Helenbar Lake overlook

To see what a treat you’re in for at the top of the hike check out this video.

For a weekend trip without the crowds you’ll do well to visit Mississagi Provincial Park. For more information be sure to visit their website.

Further reading on things to do in northern Ontario

Click on the photo to bookmark to your Pinterest board.

Mississagi Provincial Park: A Gem of the North You've Never Heard Of

Thank you to Ontario Parks for your help on this trip.

 

Leigh McAdam is a Calgary based writer, author, photographer and social media enthusiast with over 57,000 followers. Her blog: HikeBikeTravel is frequently cited as one of the top travel and outdoor adventure blogs in Canada.

Author of Discover Canada: 100 Inspiring Outdoor Adventures
Co-author of 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta

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