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Snowshoeing To The Ink Pots In Banff National Park

Snowshoeing to the Ink Pots in Banff National Park

Banff National Park is full of winter trails for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Some are well-marked well others take you into the backcountry. Snowshoeing to the Ink Pots near Johnston Canyon is one of the great options. It’s 12 kilometres (return) via Moose Meadows. The trail is well-signed and easy to follow.

Getting to the Ink Pots Trailhead

You’ll find the trailhead a few kilometres east of Castle Junction along the Bow Valley Parkway on the north side of the road. Signage is excellent. Allow 30 minutes from either Banff or Lake Louise – especially if you’re driving the slower going Bow Valley Parkway. Keep an eye out for wildlife on the road.

Ink Pots Trailhead is close to Castle Mountain

Ink Pots Trailhead is close to Castle Mountain

In the winter snowshoeing to the Ink Pots is on a beautiful trail

Snowshoeing to the Ink Pots

My husband having fun on the snowshoe trail

My husband having fun snowshoeing to the Ink Pots

The trail to the Ink Pots

The snowshoe trail is well defined the entire way. Begin by heading up through thick forest for 3.2 kilometres until you reach the junction with a trail leading to Johnston Canyon.

Bear left to continue to the Ink Pots and continue for another 2.7 kilometres. This section of the trail sees the bulk of the 220 metre elevation gain. The higher you get the better the view.

The trail flattens out just before the Inkpots

The trail flattens out just before the Inkpots

Eventually you break out into a valley. The Ink Pots stand before you – throwing off a bit of warmth too. In non-winter months they’re brilliant coloured mineral hot springs – but in winter they’re not so good.

If you’re here in the summer months, you can continue hiking up the valley and over Mystic Pass to Luellen Lake, a further 11.8 kilometres away.

The area around the Ink Pots

The area around the Ink Pots

Some coloration in one of the Ink Pots

Some coloration in one of the Ink Pots

When we got to the Ink Pots the wind picked up and the clouds rolled in. This area is spectacular on a sunny day.

It's another 8.7 km to Mystic Pass from the Ink Pots

The summer trail to Mystic Pass continues from the Ink Pots 

The return trip is fast since it’s mostly downhill. All told it took us 3¼ hours including a short lunch break. It’s a wonderful way to spend half a day.

Excellent snow conditions

Excellent snow conditions and an easy to follow trail while snowshoeing to the Ink Pots

More snowshoeing information

The Banff Parks Office at 224 Banff Avenue in Banff is staffed with helpful, bilingual rangers who can direct you to a trail that best suits your ability.

Around Banff itself there are lots of easy snowshoe trails if you just want a short burst of exercise and fresh air. Some I’d suggest are the trails in the Cave and Basin area. There are pretty loops and an out and back along the Bow River.

The Spray Valley Loop is a good choice as is the hike or snowshoe to the summit of Tunnel Mountain. Or try the busier alternative to the Ink Pots – a trip to see the frozen waterfalls up Johnston Canyon. If you want a full day snowshoe I’d recommend Sulphur Mountain  via Cosmic Ray Road.

The Lake Louise area also has lots of snowshoe trails. Try the easyone up to Mirror Lake or the trail alongside Lake Louise.

Further reading on winter activities in Alberta

Click on the photo to bookmark to your Pinterest boards.

Snowshoeing to the Ink Pots, Banff National Park

 

Leigh McAdam is a Calgary based writer, author, photographer and social media enthusiast with over 57,000 followers. Her blog: HikeBikeTravel is frequently cited as one of the top travel and outdoor adventure blogs in Canada.

Author of Discover Canada: 100 Inspiring Outdoor Adventures
Co-author of 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta

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