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A Trip To Blomidon Park, Nova Scotia

A Trip to Blomidon Park, Nova Scotia

Blomidon Provincial Park in Nova Scotia is only a 90 minute drive northeast of Halifax. The park makes a fantastic family outing as there’s nothing that beats mud when you’re a kid. And this park has lots of it especially at low tide where you can walk for miles and miles on the ocean floor.

Blomidon Provincial Park at low tide
Blomidon Provincial Park at low tide

The world’s highest tides on the Bay of Fundy

Blomidon Provincial Park is on the doorstep of the Bay of Fundy, home to the world’s highest tides.  Dramatic cliffs – up to 600 feet tall start where the mud ends.

Its the mud flats on the Bay of Fundy where you need to be careful. Tides move in at speeds most people could never outrun though they sure are fun to watch.

Plan a visit to Blomidon Park according to the Cape Blomidon tide chart available online. A falling tide is ideal. In a perfect world show up three hours before and after low tide. Don’t wear white running shoes or your good clothes as the red mud has a nasty habit of getting everywhere.

Stairs up from Blomidon Beach
Stairs up from Blomidon Beach
It's about 9:30 on a summer evening
It’s about 9:30 on a summer evening
Small waterfall emptying on the beach
Small waterfall emptying on the beach
Field of flowers near Blomidon Provincial Park
Field of flowers near Blomidon Provincial Park
Lupins are in full bloom in June
Lupins are in full bloom in June
Old tractor looks beautiful in the evening light, Blomidon Park
Old tractor looks beautiful in the evening light
Love the yellow - purple combo near Blomidon Beach
Love the yellow – purple combo
Looks more like a painting
Looks more like a painting
Boat left high and dry at low tide
Boat left high and dry at low tide
Another look at just how far the tide goes out in Blomidon Park
Another look at just how far the tide goes out

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Camping in Blomidon

There are 77 campsites in the park. Reserve online beginning April 2nd here. Dogs are permitted but on a leash. 

Hiking in Blomidon Park

While you can spend hours walking on the mud flats, there are actually five trails that meander through the park. Trail lengths range from a 1 kilometre loop to the 3.6 kilometre Borden Brook Trail.

For more information on the park visit their website.

Where to stay near the park if you don’t want to camp

The park is close to Wolfville, a pretty university town that begs a few days of exploration. And Canning, another cute town is nearby. Here are suggestions on where to stay.

In Wolfville – the four star Tattingstone Inn – is called a superb choice on Booking.com. For a four star luxury B&B check out In Wolfville Luxury Bed & Breakfast.

In Canning the Farmhouse B&B is lovely. I spent a couple of nights here a few years back and loved the charming rooms. It’s called exceptional!

Further reading on Nova Scotia

Click on the photo to bookmark to your Pinterest boards.

Blomidon Provincial Park, Nova Scotia

 

 

Leigh McAdam

Leigh McAdam is a Calgary based writer, author, photographer and social media enthusiast with over 61,000 followers. Her blog: HikeBikeTravel is frequently cited as one of the top travel and outdoor adventure blogs in Canada.

Author of Discover Canada: 100 Inspiring Outdoor Adventures
Co-author of 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta

This Post Has 9 Comments
  1. It is a wonderful place! I take 1000’s of photos in this area every year…. Hiking, biking, and running You have scratched the surface…hopefully you’ll be back again!

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