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The Glacier Lake Hike In Banff National Park

The Glacier Lake Hike in Banff National Park

If you’re looking for an early season backpacking trip in Banff National Park, you’d do well to choose the hike to Glacier Lake. On a scale of difficulty, it’s an easy, mellow one and a great choice for families. The hike is 9 kilometres one way with just 238 metres of elevation gain. 

In early summer, when so many other trails are buried under a metre or two of snow, it’s a real treat to be out stretching your legs and getting in shape for harder hikes. Don’t feel like you’re settling for this hike when you book a campsite at Glacier Lake in Banff National Park as the lake itself is a turquoise beauty – and there is plenty of interest along the way.

Glacier Lake is the fourth largest lake in the park, measuring 4.5 kilometres long by 1 kilometre wide. The views of the Southeast Lyell Glacier at the far end of the lake are pretty sweet too.

Signage at the start of our 2 day backpacking trip to Glacier Lake
Signage at the start of our 2 day backpacking trip to Glacier Lake

Finding the trailhead for Glacier Lake in Banff National Park

Drive the Icefields Parkway 1 kilometre north from where the David Thompson Highway intersects Saskatchewan River Crossing. You’ll see signage on the Icefields Parkway pointing you to the Glacier Lake trailhead parking area on the southwest side of the highway. There’s lots of parking.

Cross the North Saskatchewan River at 1.1 km
Cross the North Saskatchewan River at 1.1 km

Route description 

The chances of getting lost on the hike into Glacier National Park are slim.

Walk across the parking lot to reach the obvious trail sign. Follow the wide trail through lodgepole pine forest – apparently the outcome of a 1940 forest fire. Be on the lookout for ruffed grouse in the first kilometre. We saw one with chicks further on in the hike.

There is a small side trail that comes in from the left after about 10 minutes. Stay right heading down towards the bridge over the North Saskatchewan River at 1.1 kilometres. We were here in late June so the water was roaring beneath us.

At 2.2 kilometres arrive at the Howse River Overlook. There are a couple of red chairs so it’s a good place to stop, drink some water and enjoy the view. It’s also got a bit of history associated with it. David Thompson, a surveyor, explorer and fur trader camped here back in 1807.

From the overlook descend west (right) on the silty trail down to the north bank of the braided Howse River. You’ll follow the trail within sight of the Howse River for a good 15 – 20 minutes. There are some nice peek-a-boo views. Then you’re off into the forest, with nary a view to be found. Cross six bridges – some freshly built, climbing to the high point on the trail at 1680 metres at the 6.4 kilometre mark. 

Keep an eye out for bears along the length of the trail, especially in the summer when large patches of buffaloberries and bearberries make an appearance. We didn’t so much as see bear scat but we’re always hyper-aware and never leave home without our bear spray. 

The Howse River overlook at 2.3 kilometres
The Howse River overlook at 2.3 kilometres
Enjoying a red chair moment on the hike out at the Howse River Overlook
Enjoying a red chair moment on the hike out at the Howse River Overlook
Pleasant walking to Glacier Lake, Banff National Park
Very pleasant walking in the woods
This was curved in 1928 by surveyors
A survey marker carved in 1928 
The only wildlife we saw on the entire hike
The only wildlife we saw on the entire hike

The 2.6 kilometre descent to Glacier Lake is easy. In short order (25 – 40 minutes) you’ll arrive at the lake. If you’re a fast hiker without a backpack, you could reach Glacier Lake in two hours from the trailhead. Add another 30 – 60 minutes if you’re taking your time with a fully-loaded backpack.

When you reach Glacier Lake, turn left. Walk about 200 metres along the lakeshore to arrive at the Glacier Lake Campground (GL9). Book this through the Banff National Park website.

A historical cabin at the Glacier Lake campground
A historical cabin at the Glacier Lake campground
The campground at Glacier Lake in Banff National Park
The campground at Glacier Lake
Sweet tent setup at Glacier Lake in Banff National Park especially with the morning sun
Sweet tent setup with the morning sun
A nice set-up for enjoying a fire with a view
A prime spot for enjoying a fire with a view
Who has slept in a hammock?
Who has slept in a hammock? Doesn’t look comfortable to me especially if it were to storm!

The Glacier Lake campground

You’ll find poles for hanging your food so don’t forget a waterproof bag to stuff your food in and a carabiner. There is a privy, an old cabin from fur-trading days, a communal fire pit (you’re supposed to bring your own wood but there seemed to be quite a stack) and several picnic tables.

There are no tent pads or platforms per se, so just look around and find some flat ground. There are 5 campsites. If you arrive at the campsite and it’s empty, head over towards the old cabin and nab the campsite shown 2 photos above – as you’ll get the morning sun.

When we arrived, there was a big group of old high-school friends who had commandeered a prime location with the communal campfire. If it was really cold we might have asked to join them. Instead we found a private spot on a beach with a view where we enjoyed a glass of wine with dinner a few hours later.

I feel like I have the whole of Glacier Lake in Banff National Park to myself
I feel like I have the whole of Glacier Lake to myself
Beautiful Glacier Lake in Banff National Park first thing in the morning
Beautiful Glacier Lake in Banff National Park first thing in the morning
We found a warm, sunny place to enjoy our morning coffee
We found a warm, sunny place to enjoy our morning coffee
Enjoying our breakfast with a view down the length of Banff's 4th largest lake
Enjoying our breakfast with a view down the length of Banff’s 4th largest lake

Side-trips possible from the campground

The high-school friends had booked into the campsite for three nights. Their intention was to spend one full day hiking to the toe of the Southeast Lyell Glacier, a further 11.5 kilometres away on what I understand is a faint trail at times. I don’t know if they were successful but it sounds like a very worthy goal. Be sure to take a good map with you. The Gem Trek Bow Lake & Saskatchewan Crossing is the one to have. At the very least you could walk at least 3 kilometres on a trail down the lake.

Their other goal was a climb of nearby Sullivan Peak. We left before they set off so again I don’t know if they summited. At least there are a couple of interesting options for day trips for adventurous hikers from the campsite.

Our final view of the frothing North Saskatchewan River on the hike out
Our final view of the frothing North Saskatchewan River on the hike out

On this hike we saw loads of wildflowers – so if that is something of interest pick up a lightweight, totally portable copy of Central Rockies Wildflowers

More ideas for backpacking trips in Banff and Jasper National Parks

Click on the photo to bookmark to your Pinterest boards.

An easy overnight backpacking trip to Glacier Lake, Banff National Park

 

Leigh McAdam

Leigh McAdam is a Calgary based writer, author, photographer and social media enthusiast with over 61,000 followers. Her blog: HikeBikeTravel is frequently cited as one of the top travel and outdoor adventure blogs in Canada.

Author of Discover Canada: 100 Inspiring Outdoor Adventures
Co-author of 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta

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