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Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Canada ranks high as one of the top places in the world to see the Northern Lights. That shouldn’t come as a surprise considering our northern geography. And yet I suspect only a small percentage of Canadians have actually seen the Northern Lights in Canada. You need clear nights without light pollution and the ability to stay up late – for often the northern lights don’t show until well after midnight.

Hours float by like minutes when you catch a northern lights display. Time disappears. You get caught up in the moment – mouth agape not quite believing what you’re seeing. There’s nothing like it on earth – the magic of the night skies dancing overhead with shapes changing by the second and colours of pink, green and purple weaving across the sky.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Northern Lights just outside of Yellowknife –
Photo Credit: James Mackenzie/NWT Tourism

Here are 8 places where you have a high probability of seeing the Northern Lights in Canada.

Whitehorse, Yukon

While you could hop in a car and head out to a deserted field after looking at the latest aurora forecast, you can also sign up for a Northern Lights tour with Northern Tales. There are several  advantages to joining a tour. You get picked up and dropped off at your accommodation in Whitehorse but most importantly once out at the viewing area, you can enjoy warming huts and bonfires that make the three to four hour winter experience a whole lot more comfortable (along with cookies and hot chocolate). In addition there are guides that can tell you about the northern lights and help you with photography. Note: They do provide heavy-duty tripods.

Read: Bonanza in the Sky: Yukon’s Astonishing Aurora Borealis

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Seeing the northern lights is definitely bucketlist worthy

The Aurora | 360 Experience out of Whitehorse

Mark your calendars. From February 7th to 11th, 2019 the Aurora | 360 Experience will take place with flights scheduled to take-off from Whitehorse either February 8th or 9th.

Fly through the Northern Lights in a plane. In 2018, the inaugural year,  Robin Anderson, Global Marketing Manager at Tourism Yukon stated that “Last year passengers saw the Aurora Borealis just nine minutes after take-off and the lights continued for 3 straight hours.  We hope they break that record this year!”

There are just 80 seats available.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

First Aurora viewing flight in North America;91 passengers from 17 countries took part in the program, which consisted of a pre-flight event at the Kwanlin Dun Convention Centre, astronomy information sessions for the public at the Yukon Beringia Interpretative Centre, and tours, admissions and activities at Whitehorse area tourism attractions for the passengers – Photo credit: Neil Zeller

Dawson City, Yukon

In Dawson City, located about a seven hour drive north of Whitehorse, the northern lights make an appearance from late August until April. You can check out the Dawson Northern Lights forecast here. If it’s a tour you’re after, you can stay at the Aurora Inn in Dawson City’s colourful downtown and sign up for one of their tour packages.

Yellowknife, Northwest Territories

Yellowknife calls itself the “best city in the world to view the Northern Lights” with mid-November to early April the prime time to see them. You can check out the local aurora forecast and get a reading for the upcoming week.

With Yellowknife’s proximity to the North Magnetic Pole, Northern Lights are considered not just a common experience, but a VERY COMMON experience in the city. The other thing the city has going for it is a flat landscape and a semi-arid climate.

While I haven’t been, I sure love the offerings of Aurora Village, an Aboriginal-owned business since 2000. They offer “custom-made, heated outdoor viewing seats that swivel 360 degrees…across five viewing hills located throughout our expansive wilderness property.” 

Nearby Great Slave Lake, a short drive outside the city is another popular spot for northern lights viewing in Yellowknife.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Tourists at Aurora Village on a Northern Lights tour – Photo credit: NWT Tourism

Churchill, Manitoba

If you like the thought of combining a trip to see polar bears along with the Northern Lights, then head up to Churchill, Manitoba. With a location under the “auroral zone” the lights are best viewed from January to March. If you sign up for a tour with Natural Habitat Adventures you can enjoy a “custom-built Aurora Pod®, which offers 360-degree views of the Northern Lights through its glass ceilings and walls.” Even better – no need to freeze as you can lie back in heated comfort to enjoy the magic of the night skies.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Northern Lights viewing in Churchill at the Aurora Pod – Photo credit: Travel Manitoba

Muncho Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia

Up in northern British Columbia, Muncho Lake Provincial Park is one of the prime places to see the Northern Lights. It’s inland from the coast so it enjoys clearer skies with less cloud cover. Also access is easy from the Alaska Highway and for photographers it offers a beautiful backdrop of folded mountains. There’s also a place to stay too, the Northern Rockies Lodge.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Northern Lights viewing just outside of Whitehorse

Northern Saskatchewan

One of the best Northern Lights displays I have ever seen was in northern Saskatchewan at a fly-in camp north of La Ronge. The brilliance of the night sky and the absolute magic I encountered has never left me. That was the best middle of the night bathroom break I’ve ever taken.

If you travel north of Saskatoon you’ll find Prince Albert National Park. Head to South Bay or Paignton Beach along the Narrows Road for as they say “wide open views of the night sky.” They also recommend visiting in August, October and December for the annual meteor shower.

Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park is one of the worlds largest and most accessible dark sky preserves. In October it is also the site of the annual Dark Sky Festival. To see the Northern Lights get away from the Jasper Townsite per se, to avoid light pollution. The northern lights are best viewed between October and May.

Fort McMurray

While Fort McMurray gets a lot of press, it’s not usually for the Northern Lights. Certainly the lights have been around since time immemorial, but as a dedicated tour for a visitor it’s a new things. Fort McMurray is easy to get to from Calgary or Edmonton and now that there’s a tour company offering a two night, three day package, there’s a big reason to visit.

The Northern Lights Outdoor Excursions Alberta tour includes the services of a professional photographer and on one of the two nights, there is a presentation by a professional astronomer. There’s a warming hut, lots of hot chocolate and as many Timbits as you care to eat.

Read: Northern Lights Viewing: The Fort McMurray Experience

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

I enjoyed a continuous 3 hour display of Northern Lights in Fort McMurray

If you’re visiting northern Canada – and even some cities like Calgary or Edmonton you can catch the Northern Lights if you’re up late at night and Lady Luck is on your side. Years ago I was lucky to catch them on a November drive between Manitoulin Island and Parry Sound. But if your heart is dead set on seeing them and they’ve been on your bucketlist for years, then signing up for a two to three night tour in the far north will maximize your chances of viewing success.

Have you had an unexpected Northern Lights sighting somewhere in Canada?

Click on the photo to bookmark to your Pinterest board.

Where to See the Northern Lights in Canada

Leigh McAdam

Author of Discover Canada: 100 Inspiring Outdoor Adventures
Co-author of 125 Nature Hot Spots in Alberta
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Author Leigh

Avid world traveler. Craves adventure - & the odd wildly epic day. Gardener. Reader. Wine lover. Next big project - a book on 100 Canadian outdoor adventures.

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