22 BEST Alberta Waterfalls to Visit

Alberta waterfalls - Ribbon Falls in Kananaskis

Humans are drawn to waterfalls for their beauty and power – and perhaps even all the negative ions floating around. Nothing beats the mist of a waterfall on your face on a hot summer day or the quiet beauty of a waterfall frozen in time in winter. Waterfalls are great destinations as day trips, whether by car or on foot. Some of the Alberta waterfalls described are going to take a little work to get there, while others, like Cameron Falls can be experienced as a drive by. 

I’ve described 22 Alberta waterfalls that I think are worth a visit. In fact, you could make a summer of it, road tripping and camping, checking off all these waterfalls.

But a few words of advice before you go. The area around these Alberta waterfalls is usually wet and slick so keep to the paths and pay attention to signs suggesting caution or danger. Some like the pool at the base of Crescent Falls – that may look innocuous, have claimed lives. Err on the side of caution around all Alberta waterfalls. And if you’re after Instagram fame, use some common sense. Getting the shot is not worth an accident or death.

If you’re driving to any of the waterfalls in Kananaskis Country, you will need a Kananaskis Conservation Pass. And the same goes for a national parks pass in any of the parks noted below.

My 5 favourite Alberta waterfalls

  1. Ribbon Falls in Kananaskis – they are beautiful and not too busy as it’s a long but easy hike to get to them.
  2. Lundbreck Falls in southern Alberta – very accessible and pretty, especially so in winter. 
  3. Crescent Falls in David Thompson Country – an impressive two-tiered waterfall with a fabulous gorge backdrop.
  4. Sunwapta Falls in Jasper National Park – because there a thrill to be so close to such dangerous falls. And the hike beside the falls is lovely.
  5. Edworthy Falls in Kananaskis – little known except to hikers but they get my vote because of their gorgeous setting.
Edworthy Falls in late November
Edworthy Falls in late November

1. Alberta Waterfalls in Jasper National Park

The following four waterfalls are located in Jasper National Park and all are accessed from the Icefields Parkway. There is a short hike to reach Sunwapta Falls and a little longer but still easy hike to reach Stanley Falls.

1a. Athabasca Falls, Jasper National Park

Height: 23 metres high X 18 metres wide

Facilities: A large parking area, bathrooms, and picnic tables.

Highlights: Easy access year-round, gorgeous waterfall for photographers with lots of vantage points.

One of the top things to do in Jasper, no matter what the season, is to visit Athabasca Falls. They are just a short detour off the Icefields Parkway. The falls are some of the most powerful in the Canadian Rockies (so exercise caution), but they are by no means the largest falls. Along the trail, there are lots of viewpoints with breathtaking views into the gorgeous carved canyon. If you’re taking photos, be sure to take care with your camera because of all the spray.

Athabasca Falls are usually busy. Go early or late in the day to avoid the crowds. There is a paved pathway across the bridge that is both wheelchair and stroller friendly. It provides viewpoints from the south side of the falls. To get to the bottom of the falls, you do have to negotiate steps and an uneven trail.  

The top of Athabasca Falls - one of the most popular of the Alberta waterfalls
The top of Athabasca Falls – one of the most popular of the Alberta waterfalls
Athabasca Falls is one of the Alberta waterfalls photographers love
Athabasca Falls is one of the Alberta waterfalls photographers love

1b. Tangle Creek Falls

Height: 35 metres 

Facilities: A small parking lot across the highway and a bathroom. You could picnic beside the falls.

Highlights: Very easy access. Great for photographers year-round.

If you’re driving the Icefields Parkway, make a stop at 35-metre-high Tangle Falls – one of the most photographed waterfalls in Jasper National Park. Tangle Creek Falls is located 7 km north of the Columbia Icefield Discovery Centre on the east side of the highway. Parking is on the opposite side of the road.

Tangle Falls are one of the easiest Alberta waterfalls to see as they are literally right beside the highway, but you have to be very careful crossing it. Allow 10 – 20 minutes to visit or more if you choose to hike downstream to Lower Tangle Creek Falls.

Tangle Creek Falls - an easy stop on the Icefields Parkway
Tangle Creek Falls – an easy stop on the Icefields Parkway
John at the upper part of Tangle Creek Falls
John at the upper part of Tangle Creek Falls

1c. Sunwapta Falls, Jasper National Park

Height: 18 metres 

Facilities: Parking lot. Restaurant and bathrooms at Sunwapta Falls Rocky Mountain Lodge. Good picnicking further down the Sunwapta Falls trail. 

Highlights: Great views from multiple places around the falls, but also along the river. Quiet and very pretty nature trail beside the river for 2 km with the option to continue to Big Bend and Athabasca Crossing (14 km one way).

You’ll find Sunwapta Falls 179 km north of Lake Louise and 56 kilometres southeast of Jasper. The Athabasca Glacier feeds Sunwapta Falls which consist of an upper and lower set of waterfalls. The upper falls are very easy to access from the parking lot and tend to be very busy. Their drop-off is 18 metres – which is especially impressive when you’re standing on the bridge looking over the narrow cleft the water is forced through.

Foot traffic falls off to visit Lower Sunwapta Falls but it’s well worth the 4-kilometre return hike to see them. Take an easy trail through lodgepole pine forest to reach them. The peak season to visit the falls is in late spring and early summer during runoff from snow melt.

The start of Sunwapta Falls
The start of Sunwapta Falls
The bridge over Sunwapta Falls
The bridge over Sunwapta Falls

1d. Stanley Falls

Height: Not known but likely no more than 20 metres – though it seems like a two-tiered waterfall as there is another above not pictured.

Facilities: Small parking lot.

Highlights: Beautiful setting via a quiet trail. Excellent place for a picnic.

Stanley Falls are accessed via a hike along Beauty Creek that will take on average about 90 minutes return. The trailhead to reach the start of the hike to Stanley Falls is found 15.5 km north of the Columbia Icefield Discovery Centre on the east side of the highway. Look for a small hiker sign and a small parking lot just off the Icefields Parkway.

You’ll pass several smaller waterfalls on the hike up to Stanley Falls, the largest one along Beauty Creek. The hike is a great shoulder season hike but at its best in summer. You won’t have to share Stanley Falls with many people so its a good place to enjoy a picnic and a nature break before continuing the drive on the Icefields Parkway.

Stanley Falls in Jasper National Park
Stanley Falls in Jasper National Park

2. Alberta waterfalls in Banff National Park

There are so many beautiful waterfalls to visit in Banff – with the most visited ones Bow Falls in the town of Banff and Johnston Canyon Falls  – which is as beautiful in winter as it is in summer. My favourite of the Alberta waterfalls in Banff National Park are Johnston Canyon Falls and Panther Falls.

2a. Bow Falls, Banff National Park

Height: Only 9 metres but it’s wide and the flow is high.

Facilities: Parking lot. Stroller and wheelchair access. Benches for rest or to enjoy a picnic. Easy to walk to town for food from the falls.

Highlights: Best in spring when snowmelt adds to the flow. Popular with photographers. 

Bow Falls is in the town of Banff, a short 1.7 kilometre walk away from the downtown. They are one of the perennial favourite Alberta waterfalls to visit – as they are large, spanning the entire Bow River. The drop is just 9.1 metres or 30 feet but the volume is large, so they are quite a sight. A visit to Bow Falls is perfect for anyone who has a little time on their hands and wants to see a slightly wilder side of the Banff townsite.

There’s a good-sized parking area at the base of Bow Falls. From there you can walk a trail with viewpoints beside the falls. Allow an hour or two to enjoy the full experience. It’s a good place to enjoy a picnic too.

Bow Falls in Banff are very accessible
Bow Falls in Banff are very accessible

2b. Bow Glacier Falls, Banff National Park

Height: 120 metres

Facilities: Parking and washrooms by the Lodge at Bow Lake. 

Highlights: An easy 3 hour return hike starting beside beautiful Bow Lake. Plenty of places to stop for a picnic near the falls.

The largest waterfall accessed from the Icefields Parkway is Bow Glacier Falls, falling 120 metres or 410 feet. The falls start their life as meltwater from the Wapta Icefield, so they are in fact the headwaters of the Bow River that we enjoy in Calgary.

It’s a pleasant half day hike to get to Bow Glacier Falls starting from the parking lot at The Lodge at Bow Lake in Banff National Park. Take the lakeshore trail beside beautiful Bow Lake. At about the 3.4-kilometre mark you’ll reach a narrow canyon. Make the short but steep climb along its rim but be careful if it is wet. The trail continues to the crest of a terminal moraine and on to the base of the falls. These Alberta waterfalls are at their best in summer. 

The return hike to Bow Glacier Falls is 9.4 kilometres with a 95-metre elevation gain.

One of the most visited Alberta waterfalls is Bow Glacier Falls
Bow Glacier Falls

2c. Johnston Canyon Falls, Banff National Park

Height: 30 m for Upper Johnston Canyon Falls

Facilities: Large parking lot at the start of Johnston Canyon with washrooms. In summer t you can get food at the Blackswift Bistro.

Highlights: Incredible fun walk for all ages to get to both the lower and upper falls. Fantastic for photography.

Tops in the popular things to do in Banff category, is a visit to the Johnston Canyon Falls. Enjoy a breathtaking experience every day of the year. The hiking trail to visit the falls is half the fun as part of it is a cantilevered catwalk. In winter it can be very slippery – which depending on your view, will increase the level of fun. There are lots of viewpoints on route to the falls which are almost as enjoyable as the falls themselves.

In total there are seven sets of waterfalls, but the most beautiful ones are the Lower and Upper Falls. It’s a short and easy 1.2 km one way walk to the Lower Falls. It requires more effort to reach the Upper Falls as they are a further 1.2 km away and there is some elevation gain. In winter enjoy the sight of ice climbers on the Upper Falls.

Johnston Canyon Falls are accessed from the Bow Valley Parkway. Be warned that parking fills quickly so try to visit early or late in the day. Alternatively, you can rent a bicycle in Banff and cycle 25 km to the falls.

Upper Johnston Canyon Falls in winter
Upper Johnston Canyon Falls in winter

2d. Mistaya Canyon Falls, Banff National Park

Height: 12 metres

Facilities: None

Highlights: Impressive canyon. Nice area for photography.

The Mistaya Canyon Falls are exciting to look at – and a little scary at the same time. It’s a 1.0 km one way hike on an old road to get to Mistaya Canyon so count on a return trip to take upwards of 45 minutes. The falls are one of the most scenic spots in the Rockies. Photographers will be in their element.

When you get to the bridge look down and gape at the power of the Mistaya River. Marvel at the smooth limestone, eroded over time. Many visitors go down to the rocks – us included – but the area around the canyon isn’t fenced so be SUPER careful. 

Looking down to the swirling waters in Mistaya Canyon
Looking down to the swirling waters in Mistaya Canyon
Quite the view of Mistaya Canyon
Quite the view of Mistaya Canyon

2e + 2f. Panther Falls and Bridal Veil Falls

Height of Panther Falls: 66 metres

Bridal Veil Falls height: 86 metre drop but most people only view it from a distance.

Facilities: A large parking lot but you’ll have to look hard for the trail.

Highlights: Powerful Panther Falls is best photographed in the winter when you don’t have the spray to deal with. 

Panther Falls and Bridal Veil Falls are located at the big bend of the Icefields Parkway, 36 km north of Saskatchewan River Crossing and 2.2 km south of the turnoff to Parker Ridge in Banff National Park. The water originates on the Huntington Glacier and eventually ends up in the North Saskatchewan River.

Bridal Veil Falls viewpoint can be visited in conjunction with Panther Falls via a 10.8 km – round trip hike on a sometimes-slippery trail, so exercise caution. The 66-metre-high Panther Falls are far more stunning and powerful than Bridal Veil Falls. You can visit these falls year-round. Panther Falls is a popular winter ice-climbing destination.

Panther Falls
Panther Falls is a powerhouse
Bridal Veil Falls with a 86 metre drop
Bridal Veil Falls with a 86 metre drop

3. Alberta waterfalls near Banff National Park

If you’re into horseback riding then you might have visited the campground and gone horseback riding near Bighorn Falls. These falls are a little off the beaten track but well worth the effort to visit. You can view these falls at eye level (you’ll have to hike along the river) and then again looking down on them if you’re prepared to do some hiking. As an aside, this is wild horse country so keep your eyes peeled on the drive to Bighorn Falls.

3.1 Bighorn Falls near Sundre

Height: 60 metres

Facilities: Parking lot and pit toilets nearby.

Highlights: Great views from above the falls and at eye level. Good place for photography. Lots of hiking trails.

If you head to Ya Ha Tinda Ranch near Sundre, you can visit beautiful Bighorn Falls. There is a parking lot near the falls – but will have to hike an easy trail to see them. You can do a 2.6-kilometre loop – going in on the lower trail and hiking out of the canyon on an upper trail, or an out and back hike on either the upper or lower trail – your choice. On hot summer days, many people walk right to the base of the falls and get their feet wet in the pool. 

Big Horn Falls on Ya Ha Tinda Ranch
Bighorn Falls on Ya Ha Tinda Ranch

4. Alberta waterfalls in David Thompson Country.

Running through David Thompson Country is Highway 11, also called the David Thompson Highway. The highway stretches from Red Deer to Saskatchewan River Crossing, passing through Rocky Mountain House and Nordegg along the way. Enjoy a couple of spectacular Alberta waterfalls as you ooh and ahh over the Rocky Mountain scenery – some of which I think is on par with what you find in the Banff – Jasper corridor.

4.1 Crescent Falls

Height: 27 metres

Facilities: Parking, picnic tables, two viewing platforms, a 3 km trail that travels from the lower day use area to a Bighorn Canyon viewpoint.

Highlights: Photography. Nature walk. Beautiful area year round.

The water from Crescent Falls, a 27-metre high two-tiered waterfall flows into the deepest gorge in Alberta on the Bighorn River inn David Thompson Country. You’ll find the parking area for the falls about 25 km southwest of Nordegg via Highway 11 and about 5 km on a washboard road. In winter expect mud and ice on the road. There is excellent signage pointing to the turnoff along the David Thompson Highway.

From the parking area, descend on a trail to a couple of viewpoints over Crescent Falls. The best view of the falls is from below – accessed via a trail that gets way too close to the falls – so take a zoom lens with you and stay safe. People have lost their lives around the falls, as recently as the summer of 2020 when a trio of family members drowned. In summer there’s quite a nice campground nearby.

Recommended read: Top Things to Do in Nordegg, Alberta 

Crescent Falls in March
Crescent Falls in March
The big picture around Crescent Falls
The big picture around Crescent Falls

4.2 Siffleur Falls

Height: Hard to find any facts.

Facilities: Large parking lot

Highlights: Great hike. Good for photography. Lots of places to enjoy a picnic lunch.

One of the most popular hikes in David Thompson Country takes you to Siffleur Falls, a collection of three separate waterfalls. Getting to the falls requires crossing a suspension bridge over the North Saskatchewan River. It’s 4.0 km one way to the first set of falls where you’ll find a viewpoint over a very large waterfall. Continue for 2.5 km to reach the second set of falls and a further 1.5 kilometres to reach the final waterfall. 

We did the hike in March – and icers would come in handy as there are lots of slippery sections. It’s a great hike and the first waterfall alone is worth the effort. The trailhead for the hike to the waterfall is located 27.5 km east of Saskatchewan River Crossing.

Siffleur Falls descends through a pretty canyon
Siffleur Falls descends through a pretty canyon
Siffleur Falls starting to run in late March
Siffleur Falls starting to run in late March

4.3 Ram Falls

Height: 20 metres

Facilities: Parking lot, picnic area with benches, fire pits and pit toilets. 

Highlights: Impressive waterfalls from many angles. A great one for photographers. Easy hiking trails in the area.

I have yet to visit Ram Falls in David Thompson Country but it’s high on the list next time I’m anywhere near Rocky Mountain House. The falls are easy to access from the nearby Ram Falls campground. A viewing platform offers spectacular views of the Ram River as it drops 20 metres over hard sandstone It is one of the most impressive Alberta waterfalls – and it doesn’t get the crowds that others see.

Ram Falls - Credit: Richard Bukowski on Flickr Creative Commons
Ram Falls – Credit: Richard Bukowski on Flickr Creative Commons

5. Alberta waterfalls in Kananaskis Country

Kananaskis Country, made up of numerous provincial parks, covers a large swath of country at the edge of Banff National Park. Don’t forget to purchase a Kananaskis Conservation Pass when you visit any of the waterfalls in this part of Alberta. Enjoy some exceptional hiking on the way to some of the lesser known but still stunning Alberta waterfalls.

5.1 Edworthy Falls

Height: 20 metres

Facilities: None near the falls but pit toilets at Elbow Lake campground.

Highlights: Great destination hike. Fabulous setting. Photographers will love it.

Edworthy Falls is not a mainstream destination – but they are well worth the hike, even though the hike can only be done between June 15th and November 30th when Highway 40 near Highwood Pass in Kananaskis Country is open. Park at the Elbow Lake Day-Use Area.

It’s a 9.7 km return hike (with just 175 metres of elevation gain) and an easy one at that. From the parking lot, it takes 30 to 40 minutes to reach Elbow Lake. From there, take the trail on the left or west side of Elbow Lake. Cross over an outlet stream, approximately 600 metres past the Elbow Lake Campground. Head left up an old road (Big Elbow Trail) for a further 2.4 km. The landscape in this section is incredibly beautiful. There is no signage marking Edworthy Falls but there is flagging in the bushes and a small cairn on your left, just after you have crossed a meadow. It is a popular outing so you’ll likely meet people who can direct you.

The waterfalls plunge 20 metres into a turquoise-coloured pool and the setting with a mountain backdrop is spectacular. I would warn you that it’s a steep descent to the pool so exercise a high degree of caution – and come November icers are a necessity.

It's worth the hike to visit Edworthy Falls
It’s worth the hike to visit Edworthy Falls

5.2 Ribbon Falls – a long hike to one of the impressive Alberta waterfalls

Height: 25 metres

Facilities: Campground nearby with picnic tables and outhouses. 

Highlights: Impressive falls in spring. 

The Ribbon Falls hike in Kananaskis Country off Highway 40 is almost 21 kilometres long, but with only 447 metres of elevation gain, I’d rate it as moderate. It was a far prettier hike than expected as it follows a spectacular valley hemmed in on either side by Mount Kidd to the southeast and Mount Bogart to the northwest. When we finally reached Ribbon Falls, a short distance past the Ribbon Falls Campground, my jaw dropped at their size. 

The water for Ribbon Falls originates at Ribbon Lake. The plunge is an impressive 25 metres over a rock face. If you climb a little higher, you can see the water flowing over several headwalls on route to the rock face. The photo was taken in late May at the start of the spring melt.

John heading for a better view of Ribbon Falls with Rosie the Bernese and Mila from Mexico
John heading for a better view of Ribbon Falls with Rosie the Bernese and Mila from Mexico

5.3 Sheep River Falls, Kananaskis Country

Height: Up tp 6 metres

Facilities: Outhouses in the parking lot.

Highlights: Pretty falls – fun for photographers as you can get up close. Nice short, easy hiking trail. Great destination for a bike ride.

Sheep River Falls in Sheep River Provincial Park is a great destination – via a scenic bike ride or via a drive for some family time. It’s 35 kilometres up the road from Turner Valley. Although the falls aren’t large, they are scenic and there are a lot of different viewpoints to admire them from. This is a great place to enjoy a picnic lunch or even dinner. 

The road to Sheep River Falls is closed every year from December 1st until May 14th but bikes can visit and Sheep River Falls is especially lovely when you get them to yourself.

Close-up view of Sheep River Falls - one of the popular Alberta waterfalls to visit
Close-up view of Sheep River Falls
One of the Alberta waterfalls that is worth visiting in the fall
One of the Alberta waterfalls that is worth visiting in the fall

5.4 Troll Falls, one of the most popular Alberta waterfalls to visi

Height: Around 20 metres

Facilities: Large parking lot. Washrooms.

Highlights: Beautiful easy nature walk to the falls. Favourite for families. Option to climb to the upper falls if not blocked off.

The hike to Troll Falls is a perennial favourite and one of the most popular Alberta waterfalls to visit – largely because its easy and family-friendly and delivers not one but two pretty waterfalls. The falls can be enjoyed year-round though sometimes the trail to Upper Troll Falls gets closed in winter if the trail gets too icy.

It’s 3.4 km round trip to Troll Falls with only 60 metres of elevation gain via a well marked trail. If you choose to continue to Upper Troll Falls – also called Marmot Falls- and I really recommend that you do . Allow a minimum of 30 – 40 minutes as there are loads of scenic stops along the way and it’s a further 0.9 km one way. You can also go behind the upper waterfall – which is always a cool experience. The parking lot is off the road to the Nakiska Ski Resort. 

Upper Troll Falls is a fantastic place to visit especially late in the afternoon when the crowds have gone home
Upper Troll Falls is a fantastic place to visit especially late in the afternoon when the crowds have gone home
Troll Falls in winter - one of the most popular Alberta waterfalls to visit
Troll Falls in winter

5.5 Grotto Canyon Falls near Canmore in Kananaskis Country

Height: About 20 metres.

Facilities: A small parking lot that fills quickly on weekends. Outhouses. 

Highlights: Fabulous ice walk to access the falls. Photogenic waterfall in winter. Family friendly walk. 

I have only visited the Grotto Canyon Falls in winter via the fabulous and fun Grotto Canyon Ice Walk. These Alberta waterfalls aren’t very tall as you can see and at certain times of the year, they are more trickle than waterfall. I’d recommend visiting in winter so you can enjoy the ice walk as well.

Grotto Canyon Falls in winter
Grotto Canyon Falls in winter

6. Alberta waterfalls in Waterton Lakes National Park

If you’re visiting Waterton Lakes National Park, be sure to knock off a visit to at least one of the Alberta waterfalls. You can see Cameron Falls as a drive by though I would recommend getting out of your car to visit. The other two take a little more work, but they are both enjoyable hikes.

6.1 Blakiston Falls

Height: 15 – 20 metres tiered falls.

Facilities: Large parking lot and washrooms at the trailhead. 

Highlights: Lovely walk to the falls. Several overlooks so good for photography.

It’s an easy 2-kilometre return hike from the Red Rock Canyon parking area in Waterton Lakes National Park to visit Blakiston Falls. I’ve actually only hiked here at night to go star gazing as the skies are inky black, so while I could hear the falls, I never got a great view. The falls are 11 metres high.

There are a couple of excellent viewpoints at the falls – and they are well worth the effort to see.

One of the Alberta waterfalls in Waterton - Blakiston Falls - Photo credit: Al on Flickr Creative Commons
Blakiston Falls – Photo credit: Al on Flickr Creative Commons

6.2 Lower Bertha Falls

Height: Approximately 15 m high

Facilities: Parking lot. Pit toilets.

Highlights: Nice family-friendly hike. The falls are a good place for a picnic.

One of the Alberta waterfalls I really love is Lower Bertha Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park, a bridal-veil type falls. (You’ll pass Cameron Falls to get to the trailhead.)  It’s not a big one, rather a graceful cascading one that is accessed via a 5.2-kilometre round-trip hike. The elevation gain is an easy 191 metres. The trail takes you through forest that was burnt during the 2017 Kenow fire. The upside of the fire is some great views of Upper Waterton Lake and wildflowers along with a good chance of seeing wildlife. 

Lower Bertha Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park - one of the small but pretty Alberta waterfalls
Lower Bertha Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park

6.3 Cameron Falls, Waterton Lakes National Park

Height: 23 metres

Facilities: Wheelchair and stroller accessible. Parking lot. Heated washrooms and running water at the National Park Visitor Centre.

Highlights: Pretty set of falls you can see as a drive by. Climb a trail beside the falls. Good year round.

One of the easiest Alberta waterfalls to see is 23-metre high Cameron Falls in Waterton Lakes National Park. There’s a parking lot directly across from them, and they are easy to access on foot from the Waterton townsite. The main falls are wheelchair and stroller accessible. There is a steep trail beside the falls where you can get a view from above. On a warm, windy day enjoy the cooling spray.

Water in Cameron Falls is usually very clear as seen in the photo below. But once after a very heavy rain, it turned pink probability because argillite, a sedimentary rock containing oxidized iron, got stirred up in enough quantity to cause the short-term change in colour.

Cameron Falls is very accessible so it's a popular place
Cameron Falls is very accessible so it’s a popular place
Cameron Falls, one of the easy to access Alberta waterfalls in all its frozen glory
Cameron Falls in all its frozen glory

7. Alberta waterfalls in southern Alberta

It’s only a short drive off Highway 3 to visit Lundbreck Falls – which is worth a visit in any season. I passed the turnoff to it for years before finally stopping – and now I visit every time I’m in the area as the lighting is always changing and I think they are exceptionally beautiful Alberta waterfalls.

7.1 Lundbreck Falls

Height: 12 metres

Facilities: Parking lot, campground, pit toilets, picnic tables and fire pits.

Highlights: Beautiful setting. Nice trails on either side of the falls. 

Lunbreck Falls on the Crowsnest River are sometimes called Little Niagara because they split into two falls. These falls are easy to access from Highway 3 in the Crowsnest Pass area. It’s one of the Alberta waterfalls with a popular campsite that is just steps away.

From the top of Lundbreck Falls to the pools it’s a 12-metre plunge – which has been tackled in a kayak before though it’s not recommended. Visit these falls at any time of the year. I find winter particularly enchanting around the falls. 

Alberta waterfalls worth a visit - Lundbreck Falls
Alberta waterfalls worth a visit – Lundbreck Falls
I think Lundbreck Falls is more spectacular in winter
I think Lundbreck Falls is more spectacular in winter

Location map of the Alberta waterfall

                                                 

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21 incredible Alberta waterfalls to visit

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